SELF DEFENSE AS SIMPLE AS A GRAIN OF SAND. PART II.

Would like to share an interesting, and, in my opinion, compelling self-defense theory that I ran across earlier today.   I must admit that part of the reason I favor it is it dovetails with what I have been preaching for years.  But Matt Bryers of FightAuthority.com articulates his beliefs in such a pure and simplistic manner that I wanted to post this ASAP.

 

Bryers starts off with a photo of a hand holding a small heap of sand and implies that when presented in that manner against an attacker larger, stronger and meaner than you, the sand is meaningless against the assailant.  He can crush it in your hand, swat it deftly away, or, goodness knows, he can take your hand and drive the sand into your face just for the hell of it and then pound you into oblivion.

 

But then think about this:  what if, instead of holding a handful of sand outstretched, you waited

For the right instant and threw the sand into the attacker’s face and eyes, instantaneously distracting and (temporarily) blinding him?

 

Yes, you could easily take off and avoid and evade the attacker.  And, yes, you could take advantage of his inability to see and his shock to knock him down, kick him repeatedly until he no longer moved.

 

I am not suggesting that from this moment on you carry with you a handful of sand.  What Bryers and I are suggesting, however, is that, instead of focusing on the attacker’s strengths – which is what any attacker would prefer you do – for that is where he had you beat before you even got out of bed that morning – it is in your interest that you focus on universal weakness – injury – and “Be That Grain of Sand.”

 

After all, Bryers insists, “everyone has different strengths, but we all break the same.”

 

In future posts, then, we will talk about the Universal Weakness, which is injury, and how we can concentrate our efforts, if ever attacked with true, raw (Street) Violence, to cause injury to that person who has the misfortune to choose you as a victim because you are perceived to be weaker, slower, less violent than he.

 

Remember.  We all have different strengths and there are those  out there who will attack you because of your perceived weaknesses.  It is part of the attacker’s game plan that you will counterattack his strengths (he pulls you toward a car or an alley or grapples with you or tries to strangle you & you try to use your strength to pull away or pry his hands off your neck) instead of what I ask you to do, counterattack his weakness and his secret fears by being that grain of sand!

 

STAY SAFE

HAMMER

SELF DEFENSE – AS PURE AND SIMPLE AS A GRAIN OF SAND.

Would like to share an interesting, and, in my opinion, compelling self-defense theory that I ran across earlier today.   I must admit that part of the reason I favor it is it dovetails with what I have been preaching for years.  But Matt Bryers of FightAuthority.com articulates his beliefs in such a pure and simplistic manner that I wanted to post this ASAP.

 

Bryers starts off with a photo of a hand holding a small heap of sand and implies that when presented in that manner against an attacker larger, stronger and meaner than you, the sand is meaningless against the assailant.  He can crush it in your hand, swat it deftly away, or, goodness knows, he can take your hand and drive the sand into your face just for the hell of it and then pound you into oblivion.

 

But then think about this:  what if, instead of holding a handful of sand outstretched, you waited

For the right instant and threw the sand into the attacker’s face and eyes, instantaneously distracting and (temporarily) blinding him?

 

Yes, you could easily take off and avoid and evade the attacker.  And, yes, you could take advantage of his inability to see and his shock to knock him down, kick him repeatedly until he no longer moved.

 

I am not suggesting that from this moment on you carry with you a handful of sand.  What Bryers and I are suggesting, however, is that, instead of focusing on the attacker’s strengths – which is what any attacker would prefer you do – for that is where he had you beat before you even got out of bed that morning – it is in your interest that you focus on universal weakness – injury – and “Be That Grain of Sand.”

 

After all, Bryers insists, “everyone has different strengths, but we all break the same.”

 

In future posts, then, we will talk about the Universal Weakness, which is injury, and how we can concentrate our efforts, if ever attacked with true, raw (Street) Violence, to cause injury to that person who has the misfortune to choose you as a victim because you are perceived to be weaker, slower, less violent than he.

 

Remember.  We all have different strengths and there are those  out there who will attack you because of your perceived weaknesses.  It is part of the attacker’s game plan that you will counterattack his strengths (he pulls you toward a car or an alley or grapples with you or tries to strangle you & you try to use your strength to pull away or pry his hands off your neck) instead of what I ask you to do, counterattack his weakness and his secret fears by being that grain of sand!

 

STAY SAFE

HAMMER