Reconsidering Terrorism

I have to admit, folks, you might not learn anything new, anything that will assuage your fears and concerns as you – like I – watch the Sunday morning news (I am watching CNN) covering another mass shooting at The Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida (in the early morning hours of June 12, 2016) today.

As of this moment (almost 11AM, Sunday) on a vainglorious Sunday morning in Pa., replete with slow floating cirrus clouds and a brilliant blue sky, more than 50 innocent men and women are so far dead with almost that many in local hospitals, some of whom will probably die from their wounds.  None of whom will escape the psychological wounds.

Only time will tell us what motivated this massacre.  To me, it matters little.  We pretty much know already that the shooter harboured hatred in his heart.  Be it hatred for gays (which many Islamic radicals believe to be an abomination, or just an expression of animus for others.

Who the hell knows?

What I do know is this has been the deadliest shooting in American history.  We do know that it was eerily similar to the terrorist attack on a theater in Paris where a large number of people were gathered in a confined space (ever hear of shooting fish in a barrel?).

We also know this was a “Soft Target.”  I have written for years about the active shooter and soft targets, many of which involved our schools, work places, malls, etc.

The scary thing is that, according to my law enforcement and intelligence “contacts,” we are in (what they call) the crest of anticipated attacks against more and more soft targets across our country.

I just learned this minute that the ammunition used by this miscreant is specifically designed to create as much pain and destruction (of the human body) as possible upon arrival.  When I heard that, I muttered to myself—

“Jesus.”

SO WHAT DO WE DO?

So, what can you do now and in the future to prepare to survive and/or escape such an attack.

Truth is, I have absolutely zero fricking clue as to what to do.  If I was in this club, I would have no more idea what to do and how to do it in order to come out of this in one piece.

ALL I can suggest at this point is to scroll back and peruse my posts on the active shooter, but, heck, think about it:

  • You are in a nightclub with loud music, surrounded by other humans.
  • Your mind and concentration is absorbed in the atmosphere.
  • Your mind is in a non-combative status.  Simply put….
  • Once the shooting starts, you automatically (this is how our brain works) will absorb the sounds into an assumption that is part of the entertainment.  It will take over 2-seconds to recognize danger, and, by then—
  • It is too late.

Until my next post where I will address how to respond to a tactical mindset, etc., please stay safe.

Sorry I could not be more helpful.

The Hammer

Mass Shooter In Your Church?

Just the other day I was conducting a Defusing Aggression Training for security staff at a local Baptist Church and was asked what I would  suggest for members of their Safe Team to do if some nut job (my words, not theirs.  They’re nice people) started charging the pulpit (and the pastor) in the middle of a service.  Since the question was raised in the context of several Baptist pastors getting blown out of their pulpits by mad men in the past few years, let’s assume the person charging the pulpit is either brandishing or unleashing many bullets from that firearm!

Outstanding question, considering the fact that every 2.9 months in the United States there is some sort of mass shooting. Not only that, Rage-Shootings in our churches are not uncommon. Worse, of all the places of worship in our country Baptist venues are the most popular targets of Rage-Attackers.  There are reasons for this, but that is not the theme of this post. I thought I would do my best to answer the question posed at my seminar.  You might be concerned about your family’s safety at your place of worship, or your school, maybe even your workplace.  In my opinion, all of these workplaces (church, schools, synagogues are also workplaces) are ripe targets for Workplace Violence, which is rampant in the U.S., and, by the way, wil be more rampant in coming years…but I digress…...

STOPPING CHURCH VIOLENCE

Since June 22, 1980 when a crazed zealot stood and shouted, “This is War!” in the First Baptist Church in Dangerfield, Texas (as the pastor was leading the congregation in a song about Jesus) and raked the packed pews with bullets, wounding 15 and killing 5, including the pastor (the first mass murder in a church in the U.S) , over 500 churchgoers and clergymen have been killed to date, 145 of them of the Baptist Faith. I mention all of this to establish that the concerns of my Baptist friends are certainly legitimate.

My answer to the query about what to do if a shooter charges the pulpit is whatever it is you do, it is probably too late.  I hope I’m wrong, of course, but the Rage-Shooters I study are just that – Rage Shooters! They may be driven by an opposing ideology that the pastor and/or church has attacked; They may be impelled by serious mental health issues; or a guest speaker at the offending church might represent an opposing religious view point that enrages.  All of which, to me, at least, means that, like the shooter in Dangerfield in 1980, they will, after maybe a brief pronouncement, attack the church and all the people within suddenly and with extreme violence.  Again, I could be wrong, and I hope I am, but—

Likely, he will charge the pulpit, but probably not before unleashing Hell on the congregation on his way to  the spiritual leader of the church.  Once it starts it may be too late to stop the shooting, but the best bet is to Be Proactive instead of Reactive.  That may be your best strategy.

QUICK SKETCH OF PROACTIVE STRATEGIES

  • Create a Safety Committee.
  • Initiate and Perfect a Safety Plan.
  • Make Creating a Safe Room(s) where parishioners can barricade themselves “safely” a priority.
  • Establish and Inform about Escape and Evasion Routes, etc.
  • Communicate with local authorities and solicit ideas and suggestions for dealing with an Active Shooter.
  • Identify  Possible Groups Hostile to your Beliefs.
  • Initiate and Conduct Safety Training for your Parishioners.
  • Training Should Educate, but also put parishioners through Dynamic Simulation or Realistic Scenario Training(s).
  • Stress Inoculation/Dynamic Simulation Training for Safe Team on how to respond to an Active Shooter event.
  • Reach out and help parishioners who are in crisis.
  • Police Sources who would likely respond to a shooting-crisis, or violence, should be invited to participate in Dynamic Simulation training.
  • Local EMS (Medical Emergency Responders) should also be contacted for suggestions and/or information regarding how and when they would respond, etc.

Churches should also be aware of their resources available to mitigate and minimize the possibility of a mass shooting in their facility.

VALUABLE RESOURCES AVAILABLE

  1. Your ushers could be your front line.  Ushers come in contact with almost, if not all, of your visitors.  Train these people to recognize Signatures of Danger – verbal and non-verbal signs of danger, as well as signs that a visitor could be carrying a concealed handgun, edged weapon, and/or shotgun/machine gun, etc.
  2. School ushers and others how to deescalate and/or defuse aggression and/or even violence.  Maybe teach ushers and others on self-defense and subject-control techniques, or at least escape and evasion.
  3. Train you safety team on how to disarm an active shooter.
  4. Do not forget to involve your local police authorities.  At least those that would likely be your first responder(s) in a shooting or other type of violent event.

In the next post let’s talk about Dynamic Simulation Training designed to prevent and/or actively respond to this type of violence.

Until then, stay safe.

Hammer

WOMEN, GIRLS, MEN AND BOYS: UNLEASH THE ANIMAL WITHIN!

YES, INDEEDY. I have been preaching this in self defense classes for decades, and, trust me,  it is as true and ageless as time itself.  Deep inside you there is a phenomenon that some wizards of The Fighting Arts call the ki or chi. Your chi (Chinese),or,  ki (Japanese), according to these wizards, these great masters of The Fighting/Martial Arts, are a source of great power and energy. Imagine this chi, or ki, “right in the center of your body, deep within your midsection.  Think two inches below  your belly button, but straight back into the middle of your torso,” according to Lori Hartman Gervasi, in her great book:  Fight Like a Girl—and Win.

But, here’s the dealio.  If ever you face an attacker, before the debilitating element of fear sets in and paralyzes you, first you must get your ass in gear!  You see, this chi or ki is there, but it cannot be released like some ancient genie by simply rubbing in some arcane manner on your center.  It is up to you to have the courage, fortitude and willingness to get yourself  in action ASAP!

Your ki/chi works like the ignition of a car – from nothing to full throttle, according to Gervasi.  Instant power and energy!  Explosion from the inside-out!  But, like the key in the ignition of a powerful automobile, you must first turn it on!

TURNING THAT KEY

So, how do we explode from the inside out?  How do we pull our energy and power source to the surface?   Actually it is dog crap simple.  Release your power and energy right from the get-go.  Get moving and use the sheer power of “fierce and immediate movement from the core of your fighting spirit (which is within every one of us).”  Get moving and turn that ignition key.  In other words, instead of standing there frozen, trying to analyze what the attacker is saying and/or about to do, you need to Do Something Now! When you act definitively and immediately, you do several things that will help you pevail:

  • You invoke the Element of Surprise.
  • You get the attacker back on his/her feet & weaken his potential attack.
  • You transcend the debilitating element of “Fear.”
  • You flood your body with Stress Hormones and take advantage of an Adrenale Dump, which empowers you to fight harder and better, to run faster, to endure injuries and pain.
  • And, finally, it empowers you to Unleash That Animal – that Beast – Inside!

Deep inside you, in a place where you must go mentally, is a beast.  It has been there for 250,000,000 years.  Give yourself the permission to grab onto it and become it. Yes, BECOME THE BEAST!  Turn that fear into sheer energy and power.

  1. When your gut instincts tell you something is wrong, believe it always!
  2. Breathe.  Get oxygenated blood flowing to your brain.
  3. Move now.  Do something:
  • Put some distance between you and him.
  • Put a barrier or barricade between you and him.
  • Say something.  “Stay back!”  “Nine-one-one!”  “What do you want?”  “I don’t have time for this!erbal SelfDefense (more on that in a later post).”
  • Verbalizing also serves the purpose of unlocking that hold fear might have on you, plus, it let’s the goofball who is threatening you know that you are not going to allow him to intimidate or bully you.  Use Verbal Self Defense (more on VSD in a later post).
  • Have an idea ahead-of-time, what you will do, if he gets aggressive, and, then, do it!
  • By all means, keep moving.  Don’t allow yourself to be cemented to the floor when he attacks!
  • If possible, strike first and use the element of suprise!

In the next post:  Using the element of surprise with your first strike!

Until then, stay safe.

Hammer

PREDICTING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

PREDICTING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE –

REFLECTING ON THE FORT HOOD TRAGEDY

VIOLENCE in the workplace  has been a major problem in the United States  for decades, but, now, since 9-11, actually, it is getting worse. Exponentially.  Every conceivable type of workplace has been and is impacted by the entire continuum of violence, ranging from verbal intimidation to mass murder.  But. in my opinion, though, since 0845 on 9/11, the dawn of the most pernicious act of workplace violence ever, safety in the workplace has never been so challenged, never been so shaky.  And, again in my opinion, since the world’s (and, of course, ours) economy tanked a few years ago,  injury and death occasioned by worker against worker is a dark, haunting and damn near imminent presence in almost every workplace.

You need not look too far beyond the Fort Hood tragedy where a psychiatric fellow and co-employee turned his insane rage against innocent soldiers and civilians, killing 13 and injuring dozens of others.

Overlooked by many who have studied this and other heinous acts of senseless mayhem is the fact that over 88% of workplace violence could be prevented if warning signs would have been observed and recognized as dangerous, and over 90% could have been avoided if someone had not only observed the impending “Red Flags,” but had actually reported it or them to an (responsible) authority figure.  Course, the problem with statistics such as these fails to reveal why, more often than not, when presented with timely observations, fears and feelings about workers, supervisors, administrators  and suspicious family members (Domestic Violence Spillover is a cogent factor in many catastrophic acts of violence in the workplace) way too many “authority figures and responsible persons” refuse or fail to act decisively in such a way and in such a manner that could prevent acts of violence like we say at Fort Hood!

Now, we can debate and discuss some of the obvious nuances, including but not .limited to the effectiveness of reporting cascading aggression, et al., but what I need to focus on here are some of the Cogent Warning Signs of Impending Violence in the Workplace.

  • CO-EMPLOYEE HAS BEEN VIOLENT IN THE WORKPLACE, OR OUTSIDE THE WORKPLACE IN THE PAST.
  • WORKER IS FASCINATED WITH AND/OR IN POSSESSION OF FIREARMS (which the Fort Hood killer was).
  • WORKER IS OR HAS BEEN A SUBSTANCE ABUSER.
  • THE WORKER HAS KNOWN OR SUSPECTED GRIEVANCES WITH OTHER WORKERS OR THE SYSTEM (which the Fort Hood perpetrator certainly did).
  • THE WORKER HAS A  RIGID, INFLEXIBLE PERSONALITY (which the perpetrator had).
  • THE WORKER CAN OFTEN BE CHARACTERIZED AS HAVING A SAD AND HOPELESS OUTLOOK.
  • WORKER IS CHRONICALLY ANGRY.
  • WORKER MAKES STATEMENTS INDICATIVE OF DEPRESSION.
  • THE WORKER SEEMS TO IDENTIFY WITH PAST SPECTACULAR ACTS OF WORKPLACE VIOLENCE (would the 9/11 attacks qualify?).
  • SEVERAL OR MAN Y CO-WORKERS FEEL DISCOMFORT AROUND THIS WORKER!
  • THIS WORKER DEMONSTRATES SIGNS OF PARANOIA.
  • WORKER HAS BROUGHT WEAPON ON TO THE JOB SITE IN THE PAST.
  • WORKER RECENTLY SHOWS SIGNS OF EXTREME CHANGES IN “NORMAL” BEHAVIOR AND ATTITUDE.
  • THE WORKER IS “HYPER-FOCUSED.”  SHE/HE IS HIGHLY FOCUSED ON THE CONDUCT, BEHAVIOR, COMINGS AND GOINGS OF OTHER WORKERS.  MAY EVEN KEEP A DOSSIER ON OTHERS.

Of course, there are other “signatures of danger” that a future perpetrator of workplace violence might display, but, for the time being, because of time and space constraints, these must suffice.  Allow me one caveat, though.  A civil and peaceful individual may display any one, two, or maybe even three of the above traits, but, in order to adequately “profile a perpetrator, one should look for a cluster of 3 or 4 of these traits.  Key Red Flags, however (I mean really red, red flags) should include:

  • CHRONIC ANGER.
  • CHRONIC DEPRESSION AND HOPELESSNESS.
  • OTHER WORKERS FEEL DISCOMFORT AROUND HIM OR HER.
  • FASCINATION WITH WEAPONS, AND
  • FASCINATION WITH PAST SPECTACULAR ACTS OF WP VIOLENCE.

Stay Safe.

Hammer

Workplace Violence – What To Do?

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE(WPV) – WHAT TO DO?

A couple posts back I promised to talk about what to do if ever you are caught in a volatile workplace scenario where it is apparent either a patient, resident, client, or co-worker is about to perpetrate some serious hurt on you or another worker.

First of all, there are basically four types of WPV:

1) Violence at the hands of patients/clients.

2) Violence Associated with robbery and other crimes.

3) Domestic Violence that spills over into the workplace.

4) Violence among co-workers and managers.

In any of these cases, when you feel there is a threat of violence – and here I am mostly talking Domestic Violence Spillover; Violence at the hands of clients and Violence among workers – do your best to report your feelings and observations to superiors at the site. My research shows that over 85% of WPV could have been prevented if reported. Of course, often events and observations go unreported because the workplace has either a poor reputation for investigating complaints fairly (and for keeping whistle-blowers anonymous), or no capability.

COUNTER-WPV STRATEGIES

There are 4 stages of WPV, each ascending stage more dangerous than the preceding stage. WPV ranges from shouting obscenities to mass murder. Therefore, when I allude to Counter WPV Strategies, I am referring to strategies against Stage 4 Type WPV (Simple Assault; Aggravated Assault; Sexual Assault; Rape; Active Shooter in the Workplace; etc.).

v TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS. You wouldn’t ignore a Smoke Detector or a Fire Alarm, would you? When you get that feeling that something is wrong, there is.

v HAVE A WPV PLAN. If you are lucky, you have a forward-thinking employer, who not only has a (Natural) Disaster Plan, a Fire-Escape Plan, but has a plan for Violence in the WP, too, including:

Ø A WPV Chain Of Command.

Ø An Assigned Laison with police.

Ø All employees must know how and when to contact Security and/or the Pre-Assigned Chain Of Command in an emergency.

Ø A Communication System to alert workers.

Ø A Lockdown and/or Evacuation Plan.

  • HAVE YOUR OWN WPV PLAN. Seriously, with violence in the WP growing at exponential rates, you should have a Personal Safety Strategy, including, but not limited to answers to the following crucial questions:

Ø What can I use as an improvised weapon to protect me at my job site?

Ø Do I know where the alarms are? Do I know the Chain of Command and how to contact Security?

Ø What items at my site could a perpetrator use as a weapon against me?

Ø Is my work site (desk, etc.) situated so that I can escape, or am I trapped here?

O CONTROL YOUR SPACE. Use your environment to control your space. Prevent the Bad Guy from entering your PSZ (Personal safety Zone).  Use barricades, such as desks, chairs, AV equipment, waste cans, et al, to gain distance from the perpetrator, or to throw at him to delay his or her approach.

v STRENGTH IN NUMBERS. If possible, call on others whom you trust to gather with you against the perpetrator.

AND, IF YOU ARE THINKING, WELL, GOSH, THESE SUGGESTIONS ARE COMMON SENSE. EVERYBODY KNOWS THIS, JUST ALLOW ME TO SAY THAT, IN A CRISIS THE RAREST COMMODITY IS COMMON SENSE! IT IS BEST TO THINK AHEAD. ALWAYS!

STAY SAFE.

HAMMER

SO NOW WHAT DO YOU DO?

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE: SO, WHAT DO YOU DO?

The question my last post left you with was: “So, despite your efforts to prevent being victimized, your co-worker or client is striding toward you, his face contorted in rage, his fists clenched, and he is about to invade your Personal Safety Zone (PSZ). What do you do?

At the risk of oversimplifying the situation, there are a few things I would do as quickly as possible. And, if I may add, I would do them decisively and, importantly without hesitation caused by thoughts and/or concerns regarding my company’s Zero Tolerance of Violence Protocol.

See, the thing is, the key difference between you and the person about to main or kill you (and I am still thinking of Ms. Lee, the Yale graduate student who was choked and beaten to death and stuffed inside a wall on her wedding day) is intent. The perpetrator’s sole thought and focus is on you. You are the target and nothing else on Earth exists. If your mind and focus shifts to anything but your attacker – even for a millisecond – you are toast.

Anywho, there are a few things I would do and do quickly:

v STUN THE HYPER-FOCUSED IDIOT. A great tactic is to take the attacker’s strengths and mindset and turn them against him/her. We know he is focused only on you, so break his focus. Think of it as Changing His/Her Channels. Any move that changes his focus from Channel 6, which he wants to be on, to another channel will slow him down, fragment his strategy, and split the crucial connection between his/her mind and body.

Ø Scream or Yell “Stop!” Sounds stupid, but this will work. It will only work one time, but it will startle him, maybe give you time to escape.

Ø Physically Distract Him/Her. This, too, will work. Has worked for me on several occasions. Throw an object toward him, toward his face – something like a hat, a pen, something.

Ø Verbally Distract Him or Her. “Holy crap, Andy, what the hell is that on your shirt?” said while backing up and pointing at his chest. Once again, it has the effect of changing his or her channel.

v CONTROL YOUR SPACE. Without crossing your feet (and tripping) J-Step or move diagonally or laterally away, denying the subject the ability to invade your safety zone. Let him know what you want him to do. Say something, and when you say it, mean business. “Stay Back!” The longer you can delay the attack the better your chances for survival.

v USE BARRICADES IN THE ENVIRONMENT. Hopefully, your mind will have the ability to think clearly. There should be furniture in your environment that you can use to separate you from the attacker. Increase your distance from the perpetrator. Maybe throw a chair or something else at his feet. Always keep moving.

v BREATHE DON’T FREEZE. We all need oxygenated blood flowing freely so our brains can analyze, evaluate. And formulate a survival strategy. Always breathe consciously to kick you into gear.

v USE THE ELEMENT OF SURPRISE AND DEFEND YOURSELF. I have discussed surprise strategies in so many past posts that I don’t think I will go into them here and now. Not only that, Tactics of Surprise cannot be taught in a blog. They must come from you depending on what you perceive the attacker least expects.

v EXECUTE THE PLAN YOU HAD DEVELOPED. The reason I say I know what I would do in this or that case is I know I would always have a Plan A and even a Plan B (failure plan)  in mind before any attack began, especially if I found myself in a situation where I felt an attack was a possibility.

Stay Safe.

Hammer

MANAGING VIOLENCE IN THE WORKPLACE

MANAGING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

My last post – let’s face it – was basically me venting after the senseless murder of a Yale graduate student – a woman – in the supposedly high security lab environment of that esteemed university. The police have dubbed the murder as workplace violence, and, although I don’t completely agree, I posted a monograph on Woman and Workplace Violence (WPV). As I promised at the end of that post, let’s talk a bit about how to effectively deal – on a personal level – with people and events that seem to be cascading toward all –out violence on the job site.

FACTORS THAT PLACE WORKERS AT RISK FOR WPV.

v Contact with the public.

v Responsibilities include the exchange of money.

v The delivery of passengers, goods and/or service.

v Working alone or in small numbers.

v Working with volatile, unstable person(s), et al.

v Working late at night or in the early morning hours.

v Working in a high crime area.

v Guarding valuable properties, including drugs, etc.

v Delivery of home care services.

As you may have noticed, only two of those factors existed relative to the murder of Ms. Lee. She was working alone and she was working in the same location as what turned out to be a volatile, unstable person.

RECOGNIZING THOSE RED, RED FLAGS.

If at all possible, of course, work in the company of people whom you trust. More likely than not, if Ms. Lee had, the angry, emotionally disturbed and volatile person would have stewed in his own rage for a while and gone on his way, leaving Ms. Lee unharmed.

However, if you read my last post (Lust Or WPV?), you might be aware that homicide is the number one cause of death for women (in the workplace). You would also know that incidents of stalking, rape, sexual assault, and other types of violence are visited on women in alarmingly increasing numbers.

My point: Even if she would have gone to the Yale lab with one or two friends, the perpetrator likely would have attempted to stalk, trap and attack Ms. Lee when she was alone and vulnerable.

What then are some of the Red Flags, or Signatures of Danger, you can use to help you profile someone you want to either stay clear of, or, more likely, prepare a self defense plan against?

v A history of violence, stalking, etc. (The Perp in this case had this history).

v He/She has stalked or harassed another worker in the past.

v Some or Many of your co-workers communicate that they also feel uncomfortable around this person.

v The worker is almost always rigid, inflexible, intransigent in how he/she handles work and social-related issues.

v Displays signs of chronic sadness, hopelessness, depression.

v The worker often states his or her hopelessness.

v The worker identifies with past perpetrators of spectacular WPV.

v A Fascination with guns and other weapons.

v Reacts poorly to criticism.

v Projects blame onto others.

v Sees himself as being on a One-Man Crusade.

Ok, so you recognize several of these factors, plus, importantly, you and others feel terribly uncomfortable around the worker, plus, and now I refer to the Yale Incident, he strides toward you, his face contorted in rage, his fists clenched, and he is about to invade your PSZ (Personal Safety Zone).

What do you do?

Stay Tuned For the Next Post. Until Then, Stay Safe.

Hammer

PACE – An Equation for Managing Workplace Violence.

SET THE P.A.C.E. – A Guide For Managing Critical Threat in the Workplace.

 

I’ve been examining some protocols and procedures for managing critical incidents (my terminology, not theirs), and, while they are commendable, I believe in Verbal Judo’s paradigm (I am a former Advanced verbal Judo Instructor) for managing potential catastrophic (critical) incidents. P.A.C.E. is a flexible and enduring set of principles for handling the critical incident in a school place or other type of workplace that can be effective in resolving almost any crises I have come across.

 

A Critical Incident, by the way, is a term I use to describe a situation or scenario where a worker, administrator, student, client or patron, or the perpetrator himself has been killed, or, more likely, the threat of death or serious injury exists. Three examples that come immediately to mind are a hostage situation, an enraged intruder with a gun and/or a worker threatening to take his or her life, and, by definition one or two others down with him. What follows is a procedure that has saved lives in these and other critical incidents.

 

P.A.C.E.

 

PROBLEM. The responding person (security, Resource Officer, employee, or responding law enforcement) needs to ask him/herself and/or the agitated person exactly what is the problem here? Determine not only what is the problem from your perspective, but that of the perpetrator, also.

 

AUDIENCE. What role is the audience playing in the severity of this problem? Moreover, what danger is the audience in if they are allowed to remain on the scene? And, of course, what, if anything can be done to remove or at least neutralize the audience?

 

CONSTRAINTS. Now ask yourself primarily what is or are the constraint(s) that is or are blocking you from resolving this problem? Is there anything you can do to use this constraint to resolve this issue? What can be done to work around this constraint(s)?  I will point out how I suggest you can use constrainst to resolve a situation in a future post.

 

ETHICAL CONCERN. What do you, the responder, have to do to create the needed empathic or ethical perception to affect the agitated person? One needs to adopt a compassionate, caring and genuine ethical presence, yet remain in control of the situation.

 

SPECIFIC WORKPLACE STRATEGIES TO MANAGE AN INSTRUDER OR WORKER WITH A GUN.

(As an Example)

 

  1. Assess the Situation.
  2. Notify Police. Provide as much cogent information as possible. Be prepared to act as a liaison.
  1. a) Who is the gunman?
  2. b) Where is he located?
  3. c) Description of the weapon(s).
  4. d) Evidence that the gun is loaded? Has he discharged the weapon? What has his actual threats been?
  5. e) Are there any injured/dead victims?
  6. f) Is there a targeted victim on the scene?
  7. g) Any pertinent background information on the perpetrator?
  8. h) Quoted reasons or speculated reasons why person is carrying the weapon or plans to shoot?
  1. Isolate the individual or suspect.   Cut and Herd the Audience.
  2. Confer with police once they arrive. Allow them t  o instruct you and others on how you should proceed and how they intend to proceed.
  3. Independent of the police, if interaction with the perpetrator is imminent, do not use force or touch the person or weapon.
  4. Avoid sudden moves or gestures (I always say, “Slow It Down!”).
  5. Remain Calm. Keep voice void of fear or panic. Your tone and/or demeanor will strongly influence the outcome.
  6. Allow one other administrator know about the situation. But limit information to staff and workers on a need-to-know basis.
  7. Use pre-designed emergency signals to 0notify staff of the situation.  Deside whether to Lock Down or Evacuate.

 

QUICK GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING A WEAPON-WIELDING WORKER.

  • EVACUATE THE AREA.
  • EVALUATE THE PERP.
  • ISOLATE THE PERP.
  • NEGOTIATE.
  • REMAIN CALM.
  • GET HELP.
  • AVOID HEROICS.
  • DO NOT THREATEN.
  • KEEP A SAFE, NON-INTIMIDATING DISTANCE.
  • SLOW IT DOWN. AVOID ABRUPT, SPORADIC MOVEMENTS.
  • USE BARRICADES IN THE ENVIRONMENT FOR COVER.
  • REPORT INCIDENTS TO LAW ENFORCEMENT.

 

Until the next post, Stay Safe.

 

HAMMER

Self Defense For Women: Task Oriented Targets

The Fighting Arts for Women – Target-Focused Survival.

You might not know much about survival stress, but, for the sake of brevity, let me just say that once you are attacked from close quarters – especially a spontaneous, surprise attack – your SNS (Sympathetic Nervous System) will flood your entire system with stress hormones, which, again to keep it brief, will pretty much shut down your ability to think exactly when you need to think and act as well and as quickly as possible.

Assuming you are not preparing yourself to respond quickly (fight) every time you answer your door; every time you turn a blind corner; every time you get into or go out of your car; every time you walk down a darkened street where escape routes and barricades are few and far between you need to rely on Principles of the Fighting Arts. Principles are great because they are designed to serve you well no matter what the circumstance.

TIME PROVEN AND RELIABLE PRINCIPLES.

1. Breathe Tactically Upon First Touch (understand that 9 out of 10 victims freeze when first touched and understand that you require oxygenated blood flowing to your brain to act).
2. Use First Touch as a Trigger to Explode Into Action.
3. Always Look For Open Targets and Hit Them Hard and Hit Them Often.
· There are other key principles, but let’s focus on this principle.
· Assuming you are not training hard in the Fighting Arts, you must rely on your eyes Many victims close their eyes and just flail away in a slapping motion. Please resist this urge. Keep your eyes open, keep breathing, and become—
· Task Oriented. You can do this. You must do this. Seeking out Primary and Secondary Targets is within your power, no matter how much stress you are under. If the Bad Guy has both your arms under control, ask yourself If he’s using both hands, well, heck, what targets can he be blocking? The answer: Zero! A Bad Guy can only block two or three possible targets at any one time.
· STAY FOCUSED. There may be times when the Bad Guy has your striking levers tied up, but, if you stay focused and take your punishment for a while, one or more of the following targets will open up. Wait, keep breathing,.

TARGETS.

Ø Eyes.
Ø Throat.
Ø Groin.
Ø Knees.
Ø Nose.
Ø Ears.
Ø Temple.
Ø Back of Head.
Ø Chin (at the hinge).
Ø Sides of Neck (Brachial Plexus Nerve Motor Point).
Ø Jugular Notch (just below Adam’s Apple).
Ø Clavicles (easily assesses and easily broken).
Ø Forearms.
Ø Wrists.
Ø Top of Hands.
Ø Fingers (twisted/broken).
Ø Stomach.
Ø Obliques (Pinch the “love handles” when the Bad Guy grabs you from behind).
Ø Kidneys.
Ø Insides and outsides of thighs (Femoral Nerve Motor Point and Common Peroneal Nerve Motor Point).
Ø Back of Legs (Tibial Nerve Motor Point).
Ø Upper, middle and lower shins (Superficial Peroneal Nerve Motor Point).
Ø Top of feet.

I might have missed one or two. Fact is, as you can see, there are a bajillion targets you can hit. Hit a target well and other will open up.

Good Luck. Stay Safe. Until Next Time.

Hammer
Peroneal Nerve Motor Point).
Ø Top of feet.

I might have missed one or two. Fact is, as you can see, there are a bajillion targets you can hit. Hit a target well and other will open up.

Good Luck. Stay Safe. Until Next Time.

Hammer

SHATTERING THE STALKER’S SCRIPT

KNOW YOUR ENEMY and you shall own him, a great warrior once said and I’m here to tell you that Tsun Tse’s words are true. So, let’s take a sec and look at the Psychology of the Stalker when he’s on the street.

  • He depends on victim compliance.
  • He almost always has a pre-planned strategy, or even a fantasy script. He spends an amazing amount of time planning the attack. The thrill of the kill plays a big role in the entire “game” he plays.
  • When he approaches his target, the longer this script is allowed to play out, the more confident and powerful he feels. The bolder he will become.
  • The stalker is often stunned and confused by any quick, decisive action (counter-measure) that violates his “script.”
  • Many stalkers lose interest during the initial “testing” stage when his victim refuses to act like the victim in his script.
  • Real-Time Stalkers always have a Victim-Profile in mind.

 

The Mindset that Shatters the Stalker’s Script.

 

  • She refuses to be tested.
  • She always controls her space. No one gets in unless she wants him or her to, and that never includes a stalker!
  • Establishes a defiant “combat stance” when the stalker invades her space. Not only that, she is willing and able to act rude, arrogant and profane.
  • She always has a plan. She anticipates (If “A” happens, I will do “B.” If “B” does not work, I will never give up and I will do “C.”
  • She verbally confronts harassment as soon as it begins (“testing” begins as harassment).
  • Even though she is feeling fear, she gives the appearance of defiance and confrontation.
  • She is willing to do anything it takes to survive.

 

PROCEDURES OF PROTECTION AGAINST STALKING.

 

  1. If you believe you’re being stalked, break off your route (he has already marked you as an ideal victim and is following you to see if you enter a low-witness area, which is what his scripted victim would do. Change directions, cross the street, or enter a public building. Watch the stalker from the safety of the building (unless he follows you into the building. If so, seek security).
  2. After a time, if you do not see the stalker, you can exit the building, making sure he is no longer there (chances are, he won’t be. You have screwed up his “fantasy script.”).
  3. If he is still around, establish eye contact and look defiant. Make him aware you know what he is up to!
  4. When possible, stay in a high-witness area. If he returns and is tracking you, he will match your pace.
  5. This is the time you have to tell yourself that this is it. Prepare yourself. And the best way to prepare yourself for the coming stalker-testing, invasion of your personal space, and eventual attack is:
    • Prepare a pithy, dismissive verbal response now.
    • Prepare a flexible physical fighting plan now (Note: I did not say Counter Attack Plan. You might want to attack him before he can strike or grab you).
    • You will require 110% Commitment To Survival. Giving up when your first plan of action does not dispatch him.

 

Until Nest Time, Stay Safe.

Hammer.